Back to Top

Letters to Loyola

Letters to Loyola is a weekly email series on a variety of topics or questions for the Loyola community to consider together. Faculty, staff, and students are automatically subscribed; others may sign up here.

Thanksgiving Blessings! I pray that our holiday will bring much joy to you and your family as you feast, celebrate, relax, and take stock of the blessings in your life.

Read this Newsletter

As Loyola Week draws to a close, today we take time to honor those who serve our country in the armed forces. As we celebrate Veterans Day, I encourage us all to find a way to thank those who have served and continue to serve our country.

Read this Newsletter

Last Friday, I was having lunch with a few faculty members and our conversation turned to things that academics love to talk about–teaching, research, our students, and of course the challenges they face as they continue to navigate the post-pandemic world. What struck me about these conversations was that in spite of the challenges our faculty face, the sense of purpose they find in being at Loyola and teaching our students makes it a different experience than being at another institution. The passion with which they talked about our students and the promise of a Loyola education reminded me that being an educator is not what we do, it is who we are. This sense of purpose is of course not unique to Loyola, but I believe that it takes a new meaning at Loyola.

Read this Newsletter

I recently heard a remarkable story from Mr. Jordan Jones, S.J., philosophy professor here at Loyola. In 1940, Jesuit priest Fr. Vładisław Lohn returned to his community house in Krakow, Poland to find that the Gestapo had arrested all of his Jesuit brothers and taken them to Auschwitz. So Fr. Lohn did something remarkable: he broke into Auschwitz. He didn’t break out; he broke in because he wanted to be with his brothers. When the Commandant of the prison camp discovered him, he was so impressed by his courage that he simply kicked him out.

Read this Newsletter

Imagine this: Down 2, no time left on the clock, at the line shooting three free throws for a chance to win the National Championship. Athletes dream about being in situations like this and often act it out when given the chance. Anyone who watches sports might wonder how athletes can maintain their composure in times of heightened pressure. For me, I learned the value of meditation and reflection to keep me centered in athletics.

Read this Newsletter

This week’s theme is “Seek Joy!” As we consider our Jesuit identity and how it molds our community, I hope you can reflect on where you find your joy. We each possess talents and gifts that contribute to our own joy and those around us, but what is your definition of joy?

Read this Newsletter

November 6-12 is Loyola Week, a university-wide celebration of Loyola’s Jesuit and Ignatian heritage. The theme this year is "Seek Joy!" an important goal in the life of faith. Events will be Ignatian, enlightening, inspiring, and fun. This week also offers the opportunity to reflect and consider how we can “Live Loyola” wherever we are. You will receive a “Letter to Loyola” each day, reflecting on an aspect of our Jesuit values. And every day, you will get a chance to enjoy special campus activities that remind us of the importance of finding joy in expected and unexpected places.

Read this Newsletter

It’s time again to cast our ballots for federal and state officeholders tasked with strengthening our communities. Election Day is a week away, and I hope everyone has made plans to vote in person or via mail-in or absentee ballot, or that you took advantage of our free shuttles for Early Voting last week.

Read this Newsletter

One of our foundational values is cura personalis, or care and education of the whole person: mind, body and spirit. Caring for each other demands that we take a stand against all forms of gender-based violence, including sexual assault, domestic abuse, and gender hate crimes. More than 30 years ago, the city’s annual Take Back the Night vigil started here on this campus, as a way of providing a voice for the vulnerable and the voiceless.

Read this Newsletter

From now through October 5, Judaism observes its High Holy Days. I invite you this next week to join me in prayer for and with our Jewish sisters and brothers.Read this Newsletter

Some of you reading this may know that I am a licensed psychologist by profession and worked in the field of college mental health for two decades before transitioning into a fully administrative role. I know firsthand how painfully difficult and utterly rewarding mental health work can be. Throughout my career, I walked with students at their lowest lows and their highest highs. My clients taught me a deeper understanding of taking perspective and led to increasing my daily practice of extending humility, gratitude, and kindness.

Read this Newsletter

Unfortnately today's Letter to Loyola included inaccurate information about an Hispanic Heritage Bilingual Mass. This year we will have a Mass celebrating the conclusion of Hispanic Heritage Month. It will be at noon on Wednesday, October 12, in Ingatius Chapel

Each year we celebrate National Hispanic Heritage Month by honoring and highlighting the diverse culture, heritage, and contributions of Hispanic and Latino/a/x/e communities throughout history.

Read this Newsletter

I am writing to share with you the passing of the Honorable Maurice “Moon” Landrieu, who died peacefully at home on Labor Day at 92 following an extraordinary life.
 

Read this Newsletter

For weeks now, people from across the university, especially Ken Weber in Student Life and Ministry, have been working to plan our annual Mass of the Holy Spirit, a joyful celebration and cherished university tradition. I hope you will mark your calendars and make plans to attend.
 

Read this Newsletter

Welcome to the first week of our new academic year! As we launch the year, there is much to celebrate and be grateful for in the Loyola community.

Read this Newsletter

As I reflect on the Feast of St. Ignatius Loyola and the close of the Ignatian Year, my thoughts turn to Fr. Jerry Fagin, S.J., who taught for many years in the Loyola Institute for Ministry. “Courage” functioned as a verb for him. It stems from the Latin for “heart,” and with that one word, he encouraged people in difficult situations to act courageously, that is, with an inspired, strong, and generous heart.
 

Read this Newsletter

Today offers the gift of time to those fortunate enough to be on holiday. Taking time for rest and re-creation makes us imitators of God’s own rest on the seventh day of creation in the Book of Genesis. Today we might savor time and be on the lookout for those grace-filled moments with which this day surely abounds.
 

Read this Newsletter

Today marks the 50th anniversary of Pell Grants, a landmark program that has helped millions pay for college over the past five decades–approximately 7 million annually, including about 40% of students at Loyola.

Read this Newsletter

I hope this email finds you well as we celebrate Juneteenth, the official legal end to slavery in the United States. Today we reaffirm our support for the ongoing movement for racial justice and equality.

Read this Newsletter

As the semester draws to a close, I wanted to update you on some of the progress the Office of Equity and Inclusion has made to make our campus a more open and inclusive environment for everyone. Overall, we are ahead of schedule on the Strategic Plan for Inclusive Excellence, and by adding a Coordinator of Multicultural Affairs, we are continuing to make great strides towards our goals, including doubling campus programming around diversity, equity, and inclusion.

Read this Newsletter

One of the distinct privileges we have living here in New Orleans is being surrounded on a near-constant basis by incredible music. Known as the birthplace of jazz and the home to more than 65 festivals, New Orleans has a way of literally bringing people to their feet.

 

Read this Newsletter

It’s always exciting in a university setting to celebrate a large research grant. In our case, it’s all the more exciting when that grant not only helps to support the student experience and faculty research, but also helps young people to more easily connect with their faiths and spirituality.

Read this Newsletter

As Christians continue the pilgrimage of Holy Week, contemplating the passion of Christ and the redemptive mysteries of the cross, the Jewish holiday of Passover begins on Friday and Muslims continue the observance of Ramadan.

Read this Newsletter

At Easter, we celebrate the triumph of life over death and the resurrection of our Lord. All around us, creation demonstrates the point. Spring pushes out from the winter cold and gray (albeit less dramatically in our semi-tropical climate).  And this year, we ourselves begin to emerge from two years of fear, sickness, and death across the globe. To hope again. To hug again.

Read this Newsletter

Sexual Assault Awareness and Prevention Month began April 1 and here we are, in 2022, still trying to prevent the cruel fact that people of every age, ability, race, sex, gender identity, sexual orientation, national origin, socioeconomic background, and religion are vulnerable to experiencing the pain and trauma of the abuse of power that is sexual assault.

Read this Newsletter

A century ago this morning, Loyola launched the entire American Deep South into the era of instant communication. Our physics department built a radio transmitter and broadcast the first live voice communication from Marquette Hall, at 10:52 a.m. on March 31, 1922. On that momentous occasion, what did they choose to say? Loyola’s President, Fr. Edward Cummings, S.J., asked for donations to the Loyola building fund, followed by a piano performance by another Jesuit.

Read this Newsletter

Last Friday night, when Loyola’s women’s and men’s basketball teams were racing to big wins in the NAIA Championship Tournament, a reunion took place that many may understandably have missed. It was a moment that taught me something about the magis at Loyola.

Read this Newsletter

When people ask me who or what influenced me to pursue a leadership role in higher education, the who always comes before the what. While many people have been my mentors, supporters and sponsors over the years, my dad and mom gave me not only a love for learning but a necessary grit for me to compete in a world where women still are not taken seriously.

Read this Newsletter

For many of us, the shift from Fat Tuesday revelry to Ash Wednesday somberness can feel like an abrupt and unwelcome change of pace. But just as we enjoyed Carnival together, we now embark on this Lenten journey as a community of faith and find strength and joy from one another.

Read this Newsletter

One of the things that drew me to Loyola is the tremendous sense of community both here on campus and throughout the city of New Orleans, where the people take so much pride in their history, culture and traditions.

Read this Newsletter

Just before Christmas, WWL-TV and NPR shined a spotlight on a Loyola biology professor and his students helping to save a tiny fish from extinction. In the world of conservation, the tiniest organisms sometimes matter the most because so much else depends on them.

Read this Newsletter

I am very sad to tell you that I’ll be leaving at the end of this school year to go serve as the president of Fordham University in New York, as you’ll see in the message below. I can’t tell you how much I have enjoyed being with you, watching you flourish, listening and learning from your passion. You are more amazing than you know.

Read this Newsletter

I have made the very difficult decision to step down as president of Loyola this summer to become the first lay president of Fordham University in New York.

Read this Newsletter

I am so happy to see many of you back on campus and cannot wait for you all to return on Monday. There is nothing like distance to remind us of the joy of being together in community. I want to just remind you of some of the amazing things you can do on campus.

Read this Newsletter

A few weeks ago, I went to a ceremony where the Governor of Louisiana signed a formal pardon of Homer Plessy, convicted in 1892 for riding in a “whites only” train car. Plessy boarded that train in the Bywater neighborhood to create a test case, a challenge to the segregation statutes spreading across the South. The case went all the way to the Supreme Court and became one of the most infamous in our history. Instead of striking down segregation as a fundamental violation of the new Fourteenth Amendment, the Court upheld segregation under a contorted theory of “separate but equal.”
 

Read this Newsletter

I never fully contemplated the enormity of God’s love until I held my own newborn child in my arms and felt like I might explode with joy. That may be the closest I come to understanding how much we are loved by God.
 

Read this Newsletter

I would normally be writing to you about how Advent is a time for peaceful contemplation as we prepare for the coming of our Lord, but this year does not make that easy. After a remarkably functional several months, we end the semester as we began it – with yet another variant and yet another COVID spike. We tighten our public health discipline, again, all in the thick of exams and papers, studying and grading. Our residence hall staff, RAs and public health staff are exhausted.
 

Read this Newsletter

I want to give you exciting news on typically unexciting subjects. We are doing the hard work of tackling longstanding problems, problems that affect each of you, so I’m hoping you’ll read this update. In Jesuit terms, we call this cura apostolica, care of the institution that binds us all.
 

Read this Newsletter

Despite the anxiety of looming exams, or perhaps because of it, December is also the most joyful time of year on campus.
 

Read this Newsletter

I hope you have a wonderful Thanksgiving today.

Read this Newsletter

Congress is considering whether to greatly expand Pell grants. Making federal assistance possible for a wider group of families, and for amounts that keep up with the actual cost of college, would be an enormous help for the majority of our students. I hope you’ll pay close attention.

Read this Newsletter

The other night, I listened to a council of first-year students present their impressions of Loyola and witnessed a remarkable moment.

Read this Newsletter

One of the more dramatic moments I’ve witnessed has been the celebration of “Armistice Day” in central London. At exactly 11 a.m. on November 11th, everything stops, even traffic. With dramatic silence, Brits honor the exact moment when the treaty was signed ending the First World War.

Read this Newsletter

Every day around here, we struggle with difficult decisions – the agonizing kind that leaves you so exhausted with decision fatigue you can’t possibly decide what to eat for dinner that night. Most of us, without really knowing it, reach for aspects of the Jesuit principles of discernment, the practices that Pope Francis deems the most important contribution of his Jesuit order.

Read this Newsletter

There’s a rumor (one that George Lucas refuses to deny) that the Jedi knights in Star Wars are based on the Jesuits. The years of careful training to learn how to trust “the Force.” The ability to outwit your opponent through intellect and lives of purpose. Courage. Discipline.
Read this Newsletter

This is election season in many states around the country, and in New Orleans a week from Saturday. Voting gives me a thrill I can’t describe. I understand the cynical reasons why some folks don’t bother, but it makes me feel so good to have my say. My civics teacher in high school gave my class an assignment to volunteer on the campaign of our choice, and ever since that, I’ve been hooked. Knocking on doors – especially for those local races that matter so very much – waving signs at intersections – all of it represents a real commitment to democracy.
Read this Newsletter

Throughout history, human beings have created traditions to help them grapple with death, including annual events in the fall – the end of the harvest season and a time of preparation for impending winter. One of the most beautiful of those traditions originated in what is now Mexico, El Día de Muertos, the Day of the Dead.

Read this Newsletter

October is Domestic Violence Awareness month, a brief respite from the reality that we generally pay so little attention to domestic violence. For ten years, I had the humbling experience of running a domestic violence legal clinic, representing women (and sometimes men) escaping brutal and cruel relationships. For my clients, leaving often required both risking their lives and extricating themselves from a legal and financial nightmare. Even if survivors were willing to escape with no more than the clothes on their backs, abusers could keep hostages – children often not protected by the family law system. I learned more about strength and courage from these clients than I can describe. (And got frequent help from Loyola experts like Dr. Rae Taylor.)
 

Read this Newsletter

Somehow tomorrow I turn 50. (Students, please pretend to be surprised that I’m so old.) I’ve been spending time contemplating life and how much of it I may have frittered away reading nonsense on my phone. But I’ve also been thinking about how lucky I am to have found a purpose and to be part of an extraordinary community.

Read this Newsletter

To state the overwhelmingly obvious, this has been a tough couple of months for all of us – actually, a tough couple of years. Each of us has handled the anxiety and uncertainty in different ways. Whether you are stoic to the point of denial, or feeling particularly fragile right now, I hope that you pay close attention to taking care of yourself.

Read this Newsletter

Loyola has one of the best college newspapers in the country, according to multiple rankings over the course of decades. Not only do The Maroon reporters consistently clean up in the awards for college journalism, they also win awards for local journalism against the professionals.

Read this Newsletter

We have never had a year when it was more important to come together in community and pray, and breathe, and sing. I invite you to join us at the Mass of the Holy Spirit on Tuesday, September 28, at 12:30 p.m. in Holy Name of Jesus Church. We have much to celebrate and mourn together.

Read this Newsletter

On Monday, most of us head into the classrooms again, another beginning to the semester. I cannot wait to see you all in person – to give you a (virtual, masked) hug and to find out how the hurricane affected you.

Read this Newsletter

This week the Jewish members of our community celebrated Rosh Hashanah and the start of the High Holy Days -- a time for all of us to look inward, to be honest with ourselves about the ways we can do better. I have been praying hard about what we can learn from the brutal experience of this year (because finding meaning in suffering is both very Jewish and very Catholic). 

Read this Newsletter

I am bursting with pride at what we’ve achieved. As of this morning, 91% of our total population (students, faculty and staff) have received at least one dose of the COVID-19 vaccine, with most fully vaccinated. To break that down further, 90% of full-time employees, including 93% of full-time faculty, have had at least the first dose, as have an extraordinary 92% of students, including 96% of you living in the residence halls.  

Read this Newsletter

I’ll be doing my best this year to write to you every week with my finest attempts at wisdom, or failing that, some thoughts and questions to make us think. 

Read this Newsletter